Best of 2017: Books

The best books I read this year, loosely categorized.

Favorite Book

Uproot: Travels in 21st-Century Music and Digital Culture

Fantastic. Jace Clayton has an unnervingly well-placed finger on the pulse of modern music culture, in a way that makes you feel out-of-touch no matter how much music you listen to. I feel like I understand the music industry, global commerce, music-making, and people around the world better after reading this book. It blends together all those aspects and manages to be writing about music without making you miss the music (but the website for the book has playlists, just in case you do). A personal non-fiction book, a style I turn out to like quite a bit (Word by Word has a similar style).

Beyond Historical Fiction

The Atlas of Forgotten Places

A book picked up at the library on a whim turned out to be one of my favorite books of the year. Tying history with stories of personal struggle and tragedy, this doesn’t tie up neatly and doesn’t come across as try-hard either. A reminder of reality in a novel.

The Nightingale

This story follows two sisters in World War II through their wartime decisions and the present-day. Not quite as brilliant as “All The Light We Cannot See” but just as moving.

Manhattan Beach

Egan’s research shows in the vividness of the storytelling and the mental imagery constructed. You can feel the weight of the decisions made by the characters and their physical burdens in the novel.

The Three-Body Problem

I didn’t manage to finish the trilogy, but this novel stunningly takes the prospect of alien contact and puts it in context of Communist China, with some perspective from competing American, and Russian global interests too. Reading it the same year as Arrival (Stories of Your Life and Others) leads to echoes of similar themes, but the approach is so vastly different that I only thought of the comparison in writing this, not in reading the novel. This book is solidly sci-fi, but the role of history seemed so relevant to the story that I’m categorizing it here.

The Japanese Lover

The first I’ve read by Isabel Allende, and a love story hidden inside a story about the Japanese internment during World War II and the havoc it wreaked on families, alongside the present-day immigrant experience in the United States.

Pleasant Feel-Good Discoveries

The Hating Game

A brand new author on the romance novel scene wrote this and it is delightful. Doesn’t rely over-much on existing romance novel tropes, and manages to be well-written even while you’re rolling your eyes occasionally. Depicts the internal struggle that prevents many of us from believing something is real all too well.

The Royal We

This may be loosely Kate and William fanfic, but I. Am. Here. For. This. It made the rounds at book swap this year and I maintain that it took the classic trope of “ordinary person meets royal but doesn’t know they’re royal” and makes it unexpected and a delight.

Morgan Matson novels

The Sarah Dessen novels of a new age, with less tragic character backstories. Enjoyable discoveries for this year, and I’m looking forward to her next one due out next year.

Eligible

Curtis Sittenfeld is a delight. I didn’t realize this was a Pride and Prejudice rewrite until the end, and that made me like it more. An enjoyable read that helps you realize just how much of modern romance fiction is based on the tropes (first?) established in Pride and Prejudice.

Proper Literature or Vague Classics

The Unwomanly Face of War

This was devastating. A vivid window into the reality and the legacy of women who fought for or worked for the Soviet Union in World War II, her work manages to be both a record of history and an critical eye cast toward the Soviet government. Just as unrelenting as Voices of Chernobyl. I am inclined to seek out all of her work.

Stories of Your Life and Others

The first eight stories were great. Skip the rest of the collection. Perfect for the overly-analytical people that try to analyze rather than experience their emotions. The film Arrival was based on one of these stories.

On Immunity

A beautiful book of personal essays interwoven with research. Brings the human back to science and medicine. Also swapping this book at book swap led to my first encounter with “the first page” and my friends’ desire to have me read the first page of books aloud for a podcast.

Snow Crash

Finally read this novel and it has stayed vividly with me over the past few months since reading it. A clear precursor to so many novels that followed it, and a great reminder that what is online is never truly only online.

Fantasy

Graceling Realm series

Court of Thorns and Roses series

Six of Crows duology

I grouped these three series together because they handled in varying degrees:

  • Mind control and/or a race of superpowered/magical people
  • Romance (from hints at beginnings of love, to explicit seduction)
  • Warring states and the steps that those embroiled among them must take to win power
  • Redemption of the self in the face of personal insecurities

The Graceling series was the best of these three, I’d wager. I read the third and the second books in the wrong order on accident, and might prefer that order instead of the intended order. That could be because I’m a less attentive reader than some.

For a focus on heist and revenge adventures, read the Six of Crows duology. Not much of a romance thread through these books, it focuses more on coming of age and learning what matters.

For the most romance, make it through the near-insufferable first book of the Court of Thorns and Roses series and follow it through to the end of the third book (then reconsider rereading the first book). The next few books that aren’t out yet are spinoffs, so if you, like me, have a rule about not starting series before they end, never fear. This series has the most similar tropes to the Graceling series, so consider reading them far apart.

My impressions from the 2017 Bay Area Book Festival

For the second year in a row I attended the Bay Area Book Festival. A collection of authors, publishers, readers, and other bookish sorts also show up for the weekend in Berkeley. This year, like last year, I discovered some great sessions that led me to think about things from a new perspective and that I might not otherwise have learned about.

One great thing about the book festival is that, true to its slogan, it connects readers and writers. Much like the podcast Song Exploder, the sessions caused me to think far more about the process behind creating the things I love than I might have otherwise.

Something that struck me and my friend, however, is how few of the attendees were young. There are a lot of attendees (of sessions, especially) that seem to be retired, quite a few middle-aged people, and in the YA-fiction sessions I attended, a good number of children and their parents. In fact, much of the festival seemed designed to be family friendly.

However, in a reflection of publishing at large (perhaps) the festival neglects the population that is most clearly present in Berkeley and the Bay Area to me—the ~ * millennials *~ that attend the university and work in tech and other industries all around the bay. I saw a few other people in their mid-twenties and mid-thirties, but not nearly as many as I’d hope to see. No one that I talked to in that age range (save my friend) knew about the festival that weekend, and I saw almost no marketing for it aside from the emails from the organizers (thanks to signing up for the email list last year) in the social media sites and feeds that I follow. Hopefully in future years this will change.

I also struggled to determine who the actual target audience of the festival was based on the sessions I attended and the booths I witnessed wandering around (I’m not much of an actual booth-visitor). The fest again, advertises itself as connecting readers with writers, but it seemed to be connecting writers with other writers just as often. Whether on panel discussions or through writer-oriented booths in the park, that was a very present and understandable theme. I’m not sure it matters that the target of the festival is so broad, and perhaps it might flourish even more if it were more explicitly targeted to this wider audience. But again, perhaps not.

I attended two sessions each day of the festival, and here are my impressions of each of them.

Saturday

The first session I attended on Saturday was called Worlds We Create: Young Adult Fantasy Writers on Creating Alternate Realities and Memorable Characters. It’s only in the last year or so that I started realizing that I do read fantasy and sci-fi novels, and while I didn’t seek them out when I was younger (sorry, Tamora Pierce and Phillip Pullman), I always enjoyed historical fiction and fairy tale retellings. This session was explicitly about how fantasy writers go about creating the worlds in their novels. The moderator had some great questions, they asked about how authors develop characters to reflect the world they inhabit, whether the story or the characters or the world come first, and more.

They discussed using “sensitivity readers,” a concept I hadn’t heard of before this panel, who you can hire to provide feedback and criticism about the way that you’ve told the story of a character with experiences that you haven’t had directly. One of the authors, who set her latest book in turn of the century New York City, spoke of the balance of being sensitive to certain life experiences and having to confront discrimination with the focus of blowing it up in the book.

Needless to say, I’ll be thinking a lot more about the quality of worldbuilding after this panel. I was in the midst of reading a series that was set in a world that took awhile for me to understand, and seemed to use a glossary to attempt to offload some of the worldbuilding heavy lifting, yet the story and the characters were fairly well-developed enough for me to appreciate it and continue following through. The balance of world-building time and story-telling time was also covered in the panel, with one of the authors mentioning that she’ll use worldbuilding as a way to get started writing a new book if she’s struggling with how to start.

The second session I attended on Saturday was rather different from the YA fiction panel. This session featured Masha Gessen in conversation with Orville Schell on Truth, Lies and Totalitarianism in Russia and the U.S.. This session featured quite a few great moments. My friend pointed out that she hadn’t before heard someone speak with such attention to the precision of their language, yet that is exactly how Gessen spoke. She was very precise when agreeing or disagreeing with Schell, and didn’t mince words.

Some paraphrases of what she said in the session, along with my own characterizations about what she said, follow.

Totalitarianism succeeds through destruction… not durability of the presence of totalitarianism or genetic makeup or expectations but of the absence of shared understanding and society and other things that help you move forward in the face of it.

She took care to distinguish her perspective from that of Schell’s. He asked a question about whether totalitarianism or autocracy persisted in some countries due to the genetic makeup of people or due to a durability of the people, and she disagreed, though recognized that they agreed on the state but not the cause of the state. The absence of certain things, rather than the presence of something, is what is helping totalitarianism succeed and persist in these nations.

We’ve constructed a story about what happened in post-soviet states but not what happened in the west… democracy isn’t a state achieved by a country but a spectrum (becoming more or less democratic)

I really appreciated that she mentioned this. As someone who studied post-soviet states in college, I am quite familiar with the stories constructed there, but I hadn’t considered this perspective until she mentioned it. In my recent travels and events in the United States, it’s become clear that the Western states didn’t pay much attention to developing an identity that didn’t position other states as enemies and actively maintaining democracy.

Gessen also mentioned, perhaps in response to an audience question, why Trump admired Putin so much. In response to that, she referenced Tim Snyder in the NYRB, who wrote “Putin is the person that Trump plays on TV.” Expanding on that point, she continued that “Trump talks of power, off the charts popularity, and control… but doesn’t really understand where that comes from.” And where that comes from is autocracy. They also discussed her own article in the NYRB about autocracy.

Also discussed was the differing perspectives of politicians, businessmen, and others in an autocratic state compared with a democratic state.

There’s this belief from Russian politicians, journalists, businessmen that everything can be bought or is for sale or is transactional… a few years ago that didn’t fly here but that’s changing here… apparent struggle to understand non-transactional motives in authoritarian societies and possible explanation for a lack of understanding of civil society… If public service and nonprofit motives are questioned or not understood then democracy is challenged

Schell also brought up countries that don’t deal with history in an honest way (like many totalitarian states, Russia or China especially have quite censored and limited views of their own past), she spoke of WWII as being a touchstone in Soviet history in rewriting the past, but also continued to discuss whether a society can move forward with a distorted view of the past.

All societies have distorted views of the past…that’s trauma that societies have to deal with. Estonia for example has done a good job with this: “we trust one another, we were under occupation, and we’re going to rebuild based on that trust.”

Germany had the advantage of short period of time and everyone could remember pre-totalitarianism and talk about perpetrators, bystanders, and victims…. but it’s totally muddled in the Soviet Union; people were both perpetrators and victims and no one was a bystander.

How do you take responsibility for your own past if you messed it up? Whitewash the history…

One of the things that she mentioned as being most challenging for rebuilding in (or after) a totalitarian or autocratic state was imagination.

How do you rebuild when you can’t imagine a future or a past…and sometimes you can’t imagine the present because it’s so awful that you can’t fathom it…you reach for the past and confuse lack of imagination with understanding

When asked about her hopes for Russia in the future, she was blunt. “Russia is hopeless, scorched earth.” She did expand in response to a follow-up question to discuss the small-scale successes of some friends of hers in starting focused community organizations, but acknowledged that people seeking to make change on a small scale, while inspiring, is a way of admitting defeat. After you start focusing almost exclusively on small-scale change, you’re no longer trying or dreaming of making those changes on a large scale.

Sunday

Sunday I slept in, so I skipped an earlier morning session I considered attending so again attended two sessions.

First I attended another YA fiction session, Reality Bites: Fiction About Teens’ Real Lives, which was really great. Another panel discussion, the authors discussed what they do when they write most of a book and realize it isn’t working, sometimes all you can do is “upcycle” some of the scenes into other books. The moderator also asked about recurring themes and iconography, and while one author mentioned trees (she writes largely thrillers that tend to involve the woods), another author mentioned that she often writes about the sky, likely because it represents us against the vastness.

Most relevant of all, I thought, was the discussion on how writing novels teaches you to be compassionate about multiple points of view. Kim Culbertson especially made some great points about this. Sometimes a character has to do something differently than the way you would. She mentioned that “Lots of people are uncomfortable when they hold themselves up to another person and the edges don’t match.” But she likes to challenge that in a way, to help people get to the understanding and consideration that other people are different from you and that may seem strange but it’s actually awesome, and we need to recognize that!

 

 

The second panel I attended was about immigration and identity, Living in Two Worlds: Crossing Borders and Identities to Create Home. The moderator asked each author in turn to speak about their book which led to a great focused discussion on the themes in each one.

First, Laleh Khadivi discussed her book and the challenge about writing about two worlds, especially that “one world is never going to believe the other world.”

Next, Lesley Nneka Arimah discussed her book of short stories. She mentioned that she included Facebook in one of her stories because she was tired of reading stories set in contemporary Africa that didn’t mention social media. She underscored that while traditional infrastructure in Nigeria and other countries may be lacking, everyone has a cell phone and electronic communication is crucial to how they live their lives. It seemed out of touch not to acknowledge that reality of life in her fiction.

 

Carolina de Robertis spoke next about her novel, but my favorite quote by her came from the Q&A after the moderated panel concluded, which was that “Culture is not static; we can shift culture and push it open with the narratives that we live and write.”

Pajtim Statovci spoke last about his novel, and addressing the fact that living through the trauma of immigration, especially as a refugee, doesn’t automatically make you stronger.

Sometimes our negative experiences don’t make us stronger. Sometimes they make us weaker and sad and pathetic.

That resonated with me, because it’s easy to look at those who have survived something traumatic and assign strength to them merely because they survived. But that isn’t always the case. This thread resonated with the other books on the panel as well, because the main character in Khadivi’s book is an immigrant who radicalizes after immigration. Lesley Nneka Arimah mentioned about wanting to write about flawed characters as well, in the vein that we often think of ourselves as better than we are, so she wanted to write about characters that do the wrong thing in service of finding their own truth.

Overall impressions

The festival was worth my time to attend, and spend time thinking and talking about books with and around other book-minded people. I look forward to the next year’s book festival and the sessions! It’s always easy to attend when it’s convenient to get to and the weather is beautiful. Now I’m inspired to tackle even more of the books on my shelves…

 

Reading, Drones, and Georgie Washington

Americans are still reading books, Internet and all! Younger Americans are actually reading more than older generations, which could be partially due to the fact that with the rise of texting and social media, so much of our communication is text-based, so everyone is doing a lot more reading (and writing) in order to communicate with their friends. The original study is linked in that article and in this graph:

What are some other ways to get people to read books?

Well it helps a lot if your college library not only tells you the call numbers of the book, but it gives you precise directions to the location of the book, which is pretty awesome. Much more useful when navigating a giant library, like I have access to at the university I work at, as opposed to the smaller library at the university I actually attended.

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Parks, America, and Reading

It’s Thursday! Not Friday. Go to work tomorrow. When you don’t have to work, though, you can go outdoors! Because July is Park and Recreation month. So. If you’re not working, and it is nice outside, go outside. Weekend, planned. Just for you.

Bruce is a jungle dog.

National parks are a great place to go outdoors. The National Parks Conservation Association is taking care to recognize people who identify as LGBT+ by doing more to preserve historical locations important to the legacy of LGBT+ life in the United States. More national parks, more important history preserved, lives validated. Recognized.

Mostly white people visit national parks. Fact. As of 2011, “only 7 percent of visitors to the parks system were black.” It hasn’t always been this way. The Boston Globe interviews geographer Carolyn Finney, who is recapturing the role of African-Americans in the history of the national parks system and the environmentalist movement.

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Journalism, Networks, and Grief

Here’s what was important this week….

Felix Salmon, a formers Reuters journalist, wrote a screed about why publishing news with the readers in mind is more valuable than breaking news.

As he puts it, “when journalists start caring about scoops and exclusives, that’s a clear sign that they’re publishing mainly for the benefit of other journalists, rather than for their readers. “

Even more clearly, and something that I can relate to easily, is the idea that:

“Readers come first, and all decent publications have their own readership: they shouldn’t be so meek as to assume that their readers will have invariably found the same news elsewhere, just because someone else’s version arrived a little earlier.”

When you spend most of your time on the Internet surrounded by, to borrow his phrase, media navel-gazers who lives on Twitter, everything starts to seem like unimportant, old news. But thankfully, when you talk to others outside of that arena, it is easy to remember that news that seems everywhere and overdone in one circle could be totally absent in another.

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Language, Music, and Holidays

I am privileged enough to know a second language (although as the years pass, my proficiency is faltering…). The government and the military have a great need for foreign language proficiency for its employees (though apparently that isn’t much of a requirement for U.S. diplomats…). Given their need, they coordinated with the University of Maryland to develop a cognitive test that is supposed to determine how proficient someone can become in a foreign language. It may soon be publicly available, but honestly I don’t know if I’d be interested in taking it. While helpful as an aptitude test for job functions, oftentimes the interest and the attempt at proficiency is a great help for cultural relations with non-American countries. I’d be concerned that a test like this would cause people to give up languages earlier–if they know they’d never become fully proficient, why learn more than the basics or general education requirement?

In terms of making foreign languages more accessible, however, there is also the matter of translations. I’m currently writing about how language and national identity can have a tendency to segment the Internet, but it also has an impact on literature. One man wants to change that, by encouraging others to start their own publishing houses. He did, and focuses primarily on translated works from Russia and Central and Southern America, as he started his publishing house in Dallas, Texas. It’s a great read, with insights about the publishing business and notes about the commonality (or lack thereof) of translated literature in the United States.

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What is Old is New Again

Facebook has named its new app offering, which debuted today, “Paper”. As Lev Manovich points out, this naming signifies that “Old media metaphors are not going away” In fact, old media themselves aren’t going away.

Nowadays, fears that e-books and mp3s will dominate the reading and listening landscapes are all over the media. These fears seem somewhat cyclical, with the same old complaints cropping up decade after decade, as documented by the NYTimes more than once, Tom Standage in Wired, and XKCD, among others. Fear of the new manifests itself as dismissal of the digital, or whatever new technology has come to the fore.

Research has proven that not only do books have some staying power, old forms of music media are regaining popularity as well. Millenials are buying more books than other generations, and vinyl records are making a comeback. Cassette tapes, even, have found a resurgence.

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Memory, Experience, and Privilege

Here’s what was important this week

I wrote a really long link round-up piece about how technology and our memory interact in potentially damaging ways. And then I realized it was a blog post. So you can read that here:http://wp.me/p3qnzQ-5J

It’s something I find endlessly fascinating, and will be interesting to see how it progresses as technology becomes ingrained in even more aspects of our day to day life and becomes more visible (or not).

Technology is also changing many analog experiences into more digital ones. One photographer explores the future death of the standalone camera for the New Yorker, and reflects on perspective lost:

“As anyone working in a creative field knows, the perspective gained by spending time away from work is invaluable. Before digital (and outside of Polaroids), photography was filled with such forced perspective. No matter how quickly you worked, it was common for hours—if not days, weeks, or longer—to pass between seeing the image through the viewfinder and reviewing it in the darkroom. Digital technology scrunches these slow, drawn-out processes together.”

(If you want to see some truly analog photos, negatives were discovered clumped together from Ernest Schackleton’s Antarctic voyage. Unbelievably, they’ve been restored and printed.)

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